Stanford Cancer Institute

4:48

Published on Aug 19, 2013

Gloria Borges had a long, hard path for her recovery. She takes some time to share her experiences with her treatment and recovery.

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3:46

A decade after Steve Greiner was diagnosed with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, he couldn't help but worry when a long afternoon working outside left nearly his entire body covered with itchy sores. But, as he had so many times before, he found quick and understanding help at the Stanford Cancer Center. The Cancer Center's Dermato-oncology Clinic provides targeted dermatological care that can vastly improve a cancer patient's day-to-day life through correct diagnosis and treatment of skin conditions — from the simple to the complex. Read Steve's story: http://stanfordhospital.org/newsEvents/newsReleases/2014/patient-story-c...

4:51

The Stanford Cancer Institute, which opened in 2005, strives to combine the best in cancer research and patient care. From research in stem cell and therapeutics, tackling the most complex cancer cases, to the latest advancements in patient care, Stanford's Cancer Institute is a leader in cancer care innovations.

4:37

Three noted Stanford researchers discuss the importance of Ludwig Cancer Research funding to their work.

2:19

A pathway that shields normal stem cells from DNA damage appears to also help cancer stem cells withstand radiation treatment for the disease. Link to full story: http://med.stanford.edu/news_releases/2009/february/clarke.html

4:30

As part of National Lung Cancer Awareness Month this November, Stanford physicians got together to create and share a message of hope and educate the public about this devastating disease. Lung Cancer is the number one cancer killer in the U.S. and the world, claiming the lives of 1.3 million people worldwide each year. http://cancer.stanford.edu/lungcancer

3:02

Kipp Weiskopf and Aaron Ring were awarded top prize in the graduate student division of the Collegiate Inventors Competition for their idea of creating high-affinity SIRP-alpha molecules to block the CD47 "don't eat me" signal that keeps macrophage cells from consuming and destroying cancer cells. The molecule has the potential to vastly boost the power and killing potential of existing antibody therapies against a wide variety of cancers. Their advisors are Stanford professors Irv Weissman, MD, and Christopher Garcia, PhD.

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